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Is it worth it to track inventory quantities, not just dollars?

 

How much money do you stand ready to make & keep from this data?
Uses of quantity-specific inventory information include:
* prevention & detection of theft and loss
* guard against being overcharged by the supplier
* highest ROI on giving of samples
* shaping of messaging & promotion strategy to focus on highest-margin products, not just highest or lowest sale price
* cash flow management from clarity on reorder points so disbursements aren’t accelerated, or on the other end of the spectrum, she isn’t left without product when a customer needs it
* prevention of losses when she has too much of a non-selling or slow-moving product and has to let it go at a fire sale
* once her business is large enough such that she has to file on the accrual basis, you can help her to make sure she’s not paying too much in income taxes (or too little and then pay extra for it later with money and time)
* assist in setting sales targets & plans for achieving those targets
Track.
Profit.
Repeat.

Five Ways to Ring in 2018

Happy new year! January is the month of new beginnings and a perfect time to strategize about projects that will boost your business prosperity. Here are five ideas to get you thinking about new beginnings for your business in 2018.

1.Learn new technology.

Every year, tens of thousands of new online software applications are invented that will save us time and money. Learning at least one new app will keep us sharp and hopefully improve our business. There are many to choose from, and one way to narrow it down is to find one that will help you do your job better.

Look for an app that supports your administrative work, such as a new phone system, video conferencing, scheduling, cloud storage, shipping, document management, or data entry automation. Or you might have a need for apps in marketing and sales, such as social media, customer relationship managers, email list management, or web applications. If you’re not sure where to look, ask your friends what has saved them the most time.

2.Upgrade your accounting system.

If your accounting system is not updated to the current version, it may be time to perform the upgrade. Check with us for advice on the current version and any new features that you can benefit from.

3. Develop your 2018 prosperity plan.

The word “budget” has somewhat of a negative connotation, but a prosperity plan sounds like fun. They are the same, of course, and the idea is to determine what goals you want to reach so that you have a clear path to making your desired prosperity a reality.

4. Create a theme or mantra.

Want to stay more focused in 2018? A theme or mantra can remind you to stay on track with a particular project or goal. Brainstorm a phrase that will guide you in 2018. Here are some examples:

  • Customer service excellence
  • More me-time
  • Enthusiastic, engaged employees
  • Expanding digital presence
  • Going green
  • A prosperous new product line

5. Delegate something that isn’t getting done.

One way to feel amazingly rejuvenated and re-energized about your business is to give someone an item that’s been on your to-do list for far too long. It magically gets done right before your eyes!

We’re wishing you a most prosperous and happy new year.

How can a startup nonprofit create a budget needed to apply for its first grant?

 

A budget isn’t a guarantee. It’s a plan, a target.
Just because your nonprofit is a startup doesn’t mean you can’t have a budget.
Even for long-running nonprofits, no one can say what the future is. You don’t have to have guaranteed revenues in order to have a budget.
As you learn more about what revenue streams are available to you and what is available for your mission as a result, consider designing a target revenue portfolio.
Consider how some revenue sources come with rules about how to use the money (i.e. grants) and some don’t (individual contributions). Consider that come with easily definable costs (i.e. product sales) and some have costs that are less easily definable (i.e. sponsorships).
Use that information to shape up the expense side of your budget that corresponds to your revenue portfolio.
Then you’ll have your budget.

Accepting a Payment Plan from a Donor or Customer

 

If you accept a payment plan in any situation for any reason, bear in mind that risk is something you can play with and not just be subject to.
A payment plan introduces risk into the equation, because it’s replacing a certainty with an uncertainty.
So if you do ever accept a payment plan, propose terms that then reduce your organization’s uncertainty and/or compensate for the additional uncertainty.
Examples:
* AutoPay only
* Weekly payments, not monthly payments
* Pull from their bank account instead of the credit card account – lower fees for your organization – and only pull from the cc account if the bank account pull bounces, and of course if so then include that fee to get reimbursed plus a surcharge to cover the cc fees (check your state’s laws on this).
* Charge a financing fee
In my experience, a lot of organizations suffer for lack of training about how to identify and counter financial risks. My life certainly suffered for it. I did what I knew…and when I knew better, I did better.

How do you deal with a difficult co-worker?

 

Although it might seem strange to see this topic on a CFO blog, knowing why it’s here might might place it in context and help this to be more valuable to my readers.
[1] In smaller organizations, the Human Resource function often falls under the Office of the CFO. There is intersection with both compensation and compliance.
[2] We looove efficiency. And there’s nothing that will take a bite out of organizational efficiency than human drama. So those of us who fulfill the CFO role for a combo of hard & soft skills and not just for being geekier than everyone else are really great at this stuff.
How do you deal with a difficult co-worker?
Language is our access to high performance. Language is access to reaching our potential. Language shapes how we view the world and what actions we take.
The question has two powerful words in it and a powerful assumption, and none of these lead to making mission and none of them lead to joy.
There is no winning answer to the question as asked.
The second word (stay with me) is ‘difficult.’
The assumption is that a person is fixed and unchangeable, and this assumption is revealed by the language ‘a difficult co-worker.’
The first word is “deal.” If I do not have the ability to create relatedness with others and create transformation in relationships and in performance, I will need to ‘deal’ with people for the rest of my life.
As long as I continue to believe that a co-worker IS difficult, as if that were a fact, I will never be successful in ‘dealing’ with that person.
The key is to see the world as my co-worker sees it. To be able to describe life, work, mission, a challenge as my co-worker would use language to say it.
Once I can do that, and my co-worker knows that I can do that, change is possible.
Does my co-worker need to change?
No such assumption.
Miracles come out of communication like this. Possible results include:
* I use language more effectively because I can communicate in the way that my co-worker needs
* My co-worker creates a new relationship with life, with work, with mission, with me
* A loyalty is created between us, because I cared to get someone else’s world. Loyalty and high performance go hand in hand.
This list is only the beginning of what happens when in the face of ‘deal,’ ‘difficult,’ and an assumption of unchangeability we instead create relatedness and transformation.
Author Richard Bach wrote: “When you ask the question properly it answers itself.”
The only way to ask the real question obviates the need for the question because it illuminates the solution.
“How do you create transformation in a professional relationship with someone whom you currently do not know very well?”

How to Write Your Mission Statement

Mission statements are not just for large corporations. As an owner of a small business, you can benefit from going through the exercise of writing your mission statement. It can not only re-connect you with your “why,” it can also communicate an important part of your business to all of your stakeholders.

What Is a Mission Statement?

A mission statement answers the question “What impact will you have on the world?” It’s your core purpose, your reason for being.

Here are a couple of mission statement examples from large companies you’ve probably heard of:

Harley-Davidson: We fulfill dreams through the experience of motorcycling, by providing to motorcyclists and to the general public an expanding line of motorcycles and branded products and services in selected market segments.

Darden Restaurants:  To nourish and delight everyone we serve.

FedEx will produce superior financial returns for shareowners by providing high value-added supply chain, transportation, business and related information services through focused operating companies. Customer requirements will be met in the highest quality manner appropriate to each market segment served. FedEx will strive to develop mutually rewarding relationships with its employees, partners and suppliers. Safety will be the first consideration in all operations. Corporate activities will be conducted to the highest ethical and professional standards.

Ford: We are a global family with a proud heritage passionately committed to providing personal mobility for people around the world.

Levi-Strauss: People love our clothes and trust our company. We will market the most appealing and widely worn casual clothing in the world. We will clothe the world.

At Microsoft, we work to help people and businesses throughout the world realize their full potential. This is our mission. Everything we do reflects this mission and the values that make it possible.

NIKE: To bring inspiration and innovation to every athlete in the world.

The mission of The Walt Disney Company is to be one of the world’s leading producers and providers of entertainment and information. Using our portfolio of brands to differentiate our content, services and consumer products, we seek to develop the most creative, innovative and profitable entertainment experiences and related products in the world.

A mission statement differs from a vision statement because a vision statement communicates what the company wants to be.

Ask yourself what your business’s core purpose is.  What is the impact you want to have on the world?  Once you know, you’ll be able to write your own mission statement.

Sharing Your Mission Statement

There are many ways you can share you mission statement.

  • Make sure your employees know it.
  • Display it in the About section of your website.
  • Add it to your marketing material where appropriate.
  • Use it when recruiting for new employees.
  • If it’s short, use it on promotional items such as mugs and t-shirts.
  • Frame it and hang it in your office.
  • Mention it in speeches you give.

A mission statement is something to be proud of and something that should make people smile. Yours should motivate and energize you. Once you’ve written yours or if you already have one, be sure to share it with us.

Get Ahead on Year-End Tasks

Year-end is just around the corner, and that means a couple of administrative tasks are necessary to take care of bookkeeping and tax chores. Here are a couple of tips to make year-end go smoother.

Cleaning up

Things will go a lot smoother if you reach out to your vendors and employees and get their help to update your records.

  • Send a notice to all employees, asking them to verify their address so they will get their W-2s without delay.
  • Make sure you have the right information for vendors that you need to produce a 1099 for. Before you pay your vendors more than $600 in one year, ask them for a W-9 so that you have a current address and taxpayer ID number on file.
  • Check to make sure you have any sales tax exemption certificates from vendors that you are not charging sales tax to.

It’s also time to clean up any account balances that need to be reclassified or corrected.

  • Any clearing accounts, such as undeposited funds, should be zero.
  • Bank reconciliations should be caught up and book balances should match the bank or be explained.
  • Inventory should be adjusted to reflect accurate quantities.
  • Loan balances should be adjusted to correctly reflect interest and principal allocations.
  • Depreciation entries should be made.

Maximizing deductions

Here are a just a few ways to maximize deductions:

  • Any bad debts that aren’t expected to be collected can be written off.
  • Any inventory that is not saleable or worth less than you paid for it can be adjusted on your books.
  • For cash basis taxpayers, pay any large bills before year-end if you have excess profits.
  • Pay employee bonuses prior to year-end.

Getting organized

Create a place in your home or office or a special file on your computer to store tax-related documents, such as W-2s, brokerage statements, and tax returns. Convert them to PDF format if they are not already, and upload them to your accountant’s secure client portal as you get them.

With all this great preparation, you’ll find tax season easier than ever and a chore that you can mark off your to-do list early.

 

Which Accounting Program Should I Choose for my New Business?

 

Congratulations on your new and exciting business!
The right accounting program for you depends on what you need now and what you want later.
The three most popular ones for startups are:
QuickBooks Desktop
QuickBooks Online
Xero
In summary, if you are going to start small and grow into something quite large, go with Xero.
If you want to keep costs down in the long term and are accepting paper checks from customers, use QuickBooks Desktop as long as you can run Windows.
If you are accepting paper checks, aren’t going to grow to a 7-figure company, really need a mobile app, and don’t mind the risk of not being able to access your file when you want to, take a risk with QuickBooks Online.
~~~PROS AND CONS~~~
QuickBooks Desktop:
PRO: You only have to buy it once
PRO: Can give you detailed business intelligence on customer trends, service trends for the types of flights – this information can help you price for maximum profitability
PRO: Is the fastest of the 3 programs
PRO: If you will be accepting checks, this has a clear way of handling that
CON: If you need more than one user in the file at the same time, it can get pricey, depending on the situation
CON: Only accessible on a computer, not mobile
QuickBooks Online:
PRO: Syncs with more 3rd party apps (project management, CRM, time tracking, invoicing & payment for example)
PRO: If you will be accepting checks, this has a clear way of handling that
PRO: There’s an app which I hear is “okay.”
CON: Frequent outages
CON: The GUI slows down the whole process because somebody came up with the bright idea that all of the data entry screens should slide up and down. I hate having my time wasted.
CON: Intuit, the company that makes QuickBooks, is pushing everybody toward QuickBooks Online, but for years it has been a problematic product, and now they’re running around fixing bugs and trying to make it better.
Xero:
PRO: Syncs with the most 3rd party apps (project management, CRM, time tracking, invoicing & payment, analysis, forecasting for example)
PRO: In an all-digital environment, it saves you the most amount of time in regular bookkeeping. It pretty much handles everything automatically.
PRO: Has 2 tracking categories in comparison to 1 in QuickBooks, so if you’re going to build a large business with different locations and lines of service, it’s all clear and trackable so you can see things clearly and manage things well.
PRO: There is an **amazing** app
PRO: Once the business grows and you have people helping you, you can approve bills in the system in order to keep track of your money
PRO: They are the up-and-coming cloud-based accounting app taking the world by storm. No bugs. No outages. And getting better all the time.
CON: Doesn’t handle batches of customer paper checks very well.

What Should I Expect From My QuickBooks Trainer?

Start by sharing your business strategy and business model so your trainer can activate features that you’ll need for external and internal reporting, such as:
* bank accounts, including PayPal
* receivables
* jobs vs. customers
* customer types
* inventory features
* item specifications
* item groups
* price levels
* credit card accounts
* payables
* sales tax
* class tracking
* 1099 setup
Then learn how to pull meaningful information from your QuickBooks file and how to interpret that information and make money with that information. If your company is new, have the trainer use a sample file from your own industry to teach you. Examples are: Financial statements, aging reports, job profitability reports, Profit & Loss by business segment or location.
Next: Back-fill into the data entry that’s required to produce those reports. Sales cycle, purchasing cycle, how to do an inventory count & inventory adjustment if you have inventory. Your training should include bank feeds, information about the best 3rd party apps (if any) for you, and the massive time-saving merits of attaching files to transactions and list items.
Next learn how to check your own data with error trapping techniques. For example, if you’re using class tracking, then the Profit & Loss Unclassified report should always be empty. Undeposited Funds should never be stale; the bank reconciliation detail will show transactions that have been outstanding for too long. Stay on top of this and you’ll avoid an irate vendor who hasn’t gotten paid because the check that you wrote is sitting on someone’s desk. You’ll also avoid making a decision based on incorrect financial statements.
To put a bow on the pre-structured piece, learn best practices in backing up the file, data security.
Don’t sign on to a training without a final phase that includes trainer availability for questions that will arise as you actually use the file. You can discuss with your trainer if you want anytime availability for questions as they arise vs. weekly sessions to get the answers, and you’ll document your questions in a list as they come up.

Figuring Out the Real Value of a Compliance Project

How do you measure the value of a compliance service that you received…or provided?
A story recently came my way in which a business owner received professional services required to help his business be in compliance with federal and state laws.
Specialty knowledge was required to accurately complete the right forms.
He engaged the services of an expert who got the job done…but didn’t want to pay the invoice in full because it just didn’t seem worth the price tag.
As a buyer, have you ever felt like that?
As a service provider, has that ever happened to you?
Let’s hone in on why the business owner did not perceive value for the service. In this case, it was because there just weren’t that many documents produced.
I can’t blame the business owner for using what he knows – and a quantitative metric, at that – in order to assess value.
However, this needs to be a lesson for all of us, those who engage the services of others and those who provide services.
Notice what metric you’re using to assess value. And use the right metric.
“Number of pages produced” is an inaccurate and unhelpful metric.
Ask yourself:
* What isn’t possible without said documents
* Comparable pricing with other service providers for the same level of speed, accuracy, and other factors in the relationship
* Opportunity cost of his time if he were to do this himself
* Length of time that it takes anyone to be able to build the expertise to handle this
* Making sure the RIGHT documents get prepared
* The fallout from the documents being prepared incorrectly or late
The Emancipation Proclamation is only 5 pages long.
The Declaration of Independence is only 1 page long.
But “number of pages” is what he knows to use as a measurement of value in the face of nothing better.
Service providers: Teach your clients how to measure value, and you’ll empower them for life. And thereby get them present to the amazing value they have access to by working with you.
Business leaders: Beware of illusion of value that comes when you measure something that is NOT correlated with actual value. Get clear with yourself and with your service provider about the real indicators of value before your engagement begins, and you’ll both be delighted and better off after your project is complete.
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