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Which Accounting Program Should I Choose for my New Business?

 

Congratulations on your new and exciting business!
The right accounting program for you depends on what you need now and what you want later.
The three most popular ones for startups are:
QuickBooks Desktop
QuickBooks Online
Xero
In summary, if you are going to start small and grow into something quite large, go with Xero.
If you want to keep costs down in the long term and are accepting paper checks from customers, use QuickBooks Desktop as long as you can run Windows.
If you are accepting paper checks, aren’t going to grow to a 7-figure company, really need a mobile app, and don’t mind the risk of not being able to access your file when you want to, take a risk with QuickBooks Online.
~~~PROS AND CONS~~~
QuickBooks Desktop:
PRO: You only have to buy it once
PRO: Can give you detailed business intelligence on customer trends, service trends for the types of flights – this information can help you price for maximum profitability
PRO: Is the fastest of the 3 programs
PRO: If you will be accepting checks, this has a clear way of handling that
CON: If you need more than one user in the file at the same time, it can get pricey, depending on the situation
CON: Only accessible on a computer, not mobile
QuickBooks Online:
PRO: Syncs with more 3rd party apps (project management, CRM, time tracking, invoicing & payment for example)
PRO: If you will be accepting checks, this has a clear way of handling that
PRO: There’s an app which I hear is “okay.”
CON: Frequent outages
CON: The GUI slows down the whole process because somebody came up with the bright idea that all of the data entry screens should slide up and down. I hate having my time wasted.
CON: Intuit, the company that makes QuickBooks, is pushing everybody toward QuickBooks Online, but for years it has been a problematic product, and now they’re running around fixing bugs and trying to make it better.
Xero:
PRO: Syncs with the most 3rd party apps (project management, CRM, time tracking, invoicing & payment, analysis, forecasting for example)
PRO: In an all-digital environment, it saves you the most amount of time in regular bookkeeping. It pretty much handles everything automatically.
PRO: Has 2 tracking categories in comparison to 1 in QuickBooks, so if you’re going to build a large business with different locations and lines of service, it’s all clear and trackable so you can see things clearly and manage things well.
PRO: There is an **amazing** app
PRO: Once the business grows and you have people helping you, you can approve bills in the system in order to keep track of your money
PRO: They are the up-and-coming cloud-based accounting app taking the world by storm. No bugs. No outages. And getting better all the time.
CON: Doesn’t handle batches of customer paper checks very well.

What Should I Expect From My QuickBooks Trainer?

Start by sharing your business strategy and business model so your trainer can activate features that you’ll need for external and internal reporting, such as:
* bank accounts, including PayPal
* receivables
* jobs vs. customers
* customer types
* inventory features
* item specifications
* item groups
* price levels
* credit card accounts
* payables
* sales tax
* class tracking
* 1099 setup
Then learn how to pull meaningful information from your QuickBooks file and how to interpret that information and make money with that information. If your company is new, have the trainer use a sample file from your own industry to teach you. Examples are: Financial statements, aging reports, job profitability reports, Profit & Loss by business segment or location.
Next: Back-fill into the data entry that’s required to produce those reports. Sales cycle, purchasing cycle, how to do an inventory count & inventory adjustment if you have inventory. Your training should include bank feeds, information about the best 3rd party apps (if any) for you, and the massive time-saving merits of attaching files to transactions and list items.
Next learn how to check your own data with error trapping techniques. For example, if you’re using class tracking, then the Profit & Loss Unclassified report should always be empty. Undeposited Funds should never be stale; the bank reconciliation detail will show transactions that have been outstanding for too long. Stay on top of this and you’ll avoid an irate vendor who hasn’t gotten paid because the check that you wrote is sitting on someone’s desk. You’ll also avoid making a decision based on incorrect financial statements.
To put a bow on the pre-structured piece, learn best practices in backing up the file, data security.
Don’t sign on to a training without a final phase that includes trainer availability for questions that will arise as you actually use the file. You can discuss with your trainer if you want anytime availability for questions as they arise vs. weekly sessions to get the answers, and you’ll document your questions in a list as they come up.

Figuring Out the Real Value of a Compliance Project

How do you measure the value of a compliance service that you received…or provided?
A story recently came my way in which a business owner received professional services required to help his business be in compliance with federal and state laws.
Specialty knowledge was required to accurately complete the right forms.
He engaged the services of an expert who got the job done…but didn’t want to pay the invoice in full because it just didn’t seem worth the price tag.
As a buyer, have you ever felt like that?
As a service provider, has that ever happened to you?
Let’s hone in on why the business owner did not perceive value for the service. In this case, it was because there just weren’t that many documents produced.
I can’t blame the business owner for using what he knows – and a quantitative metric, at that – in order to assess value.
However, this needs to be a lesson for all of us, those who engage the services of others and those who provide services.
Notice what metric you’re using to assess value. And use the right metric.
“Number of pages produced” is an inaccurate and unhelpful metric.
Ask yourself:
* What isn’t possible without said documents
* Comparable pricing with other service providers for the same level of speed, accuracy, and other factors in the relationship
* Opportunity cost of his time if he were to do this himself
* Length of time that it takes anyone to be able to build the expertise to handle this
* Making sure the RIGHT documents get prepared
* The fallout from the documents being prepared incorrectly or late
The Emancipation Proclamation is only 5 pages long.
The Declaration of Independence is only 1 page long.
But “number of pages” is what he knows to use as a measurement of value in the face of nothing better.
Service providers: Teach your clients how to measure value, and you’ll empower them for life. And thereby get them present to the amazing value they have access to by working with you.
Business leaders: Beware of illusion of value that comes when you measure something that is NOT correlated with actual value. Get clear with yourself and with your service provider about the real indicators of value before your engagement begins, and you’ll both be delighted and better off after your project is complete.

The Perfect Chart of Accounts for Your Business

Your “Chart of Accounts” is the list of accounts in your accounting software.  The accounts are listed in your reports, and the totals allow you to determine how much you’ve spent, made, own, or owe depending on the type of account.

It’s essential to create a list of accounts that you need in order to make better business decisions.  Your chart of accounts needs to be designed intentionally.  If it hasn’t been, it’s never too late.

Two Types of Accounts

There are two major types of accounts:

  1. Balance sheet accounts that tell what you own and owe.  These are determined by your checking accounts, inventory, and credit cards.
  2. Income statement accounts that tell you about current period operating results.  These, in turn, have two major categories, income and expenses.  For companies with inventory, expenses are further broken out into cost of goods sold and other expenses.

Three Purposes

A chart of accounts should meet three needs:

  • Make it really fast for you to do your taxes
  • Give you all sorts of “Aha’s”
  • Allow you to spend far more time on revenue analysis than expense analysis because that’s where success lies for small businesses

Taxes

Your accounts should be the same as (or be able to be grouped into) the lines on your tax return.  You can find a copy of the tax form you fill out. For example, a sole proprietor will use a Schedule C of the 1040, and a corporation will complete an 1120.

There are a few special needs, such as meals and entertainment which are only partially deductible, that you need to pay special attention to. We can help you with that.

Aha

As small business owners, we work with a gut feel, but when you see what you’ve made or spent in black and white, it takes on a whole new level of meaning.  Your income statement and other reports should do that for you.  If they don’t you may not have your accounts set up right.

Revenue

Think about how you want to see your revenue:

  • By product line
  • By major supplier
  • By category of solution to the customer
  • By customer type
  • By service type
  • By location (you can also use Class for this)
  • By job
  • By distribution method

We can help you brainstorm based on your industry and type of business.

Actionable Intelligence

If you’ve been putting all your revenue into one revenue account, it will be exciting the first time you see your new Profit and Loss statement.

If you’ve been breaking out your revenue but it hasn’t led to any actionable change in your business, then there may be a better way to break it out.

If you’re happy with the way your revenue is broken out, then think about how you can take it to the next level.

Once you see your new chart of accounts, you will likely have even more questions.  The chart of accounts can be an evolving entity, designed to serve your business needs.

When Should I Outsource My Bookkeeping?

You say that you’re not ready to outsource bookkeeping. I’m going to challenge you to get there. Here’s how:
[1] Become a leader in your own company
Make sure you get trained in how to delegate your bookkeeping, not abdicate it. That’s how microbusinesses go out of business. No oversight, and their money is gone, no legal fund either to pursue it. Just gone. And even if there’s no theft, what’s the point of bookkeeping if you’re not doing anything with the information? Delegate, and interpret the reports to make a decision (see #3 below for more on that).
[2] Get an ROI
If the money isn’t there yet to pay for it, that’s because you don’t have an engine to turn your time into dollars. You will be ready to get your bookkeeping outsourced when you are aware of how much more time will become available to you and how much profit you can reliably generate with that extra time.
[3] Learn how to turn your data into cash
Get trained on how to turn your accounting information into cash. Why bother with bookkeeping at all? There’s no point at all…unless you’re prepared to learn how to make money or save money (or both) with the information that you get from your bookkeeping records.
Until all 3 of the above are in place, don’t bother with your bookkeeping and don’t fret about outsourcing. Take it off your plate. Then make your time more financially valuable. Then get trained in how to monetize your accounting information. Then get trained. in how to delegate. Then find an expert.

Five Numbers You Should Know About Your 2016 Performance

Before we get too far into 2017, let’s take a look back at 2016 results and five meaningful numbers you may want to discover about your business’s performance.  To start, grab your 2016 income statement, or better yet, give us a call to help you compute and interpret your results.

Revenue per Employee

This number measures a company’s productivity with regard to its employees and is relevant and meaningful for all industries.  If you have part-time employees, compute a full time equivalent total and use that as your denominator.

Compare this number to prior years to see if your company is getting more or less productive.  Also compare this number to businesses in your same industry to see how your company compares to peer companies.

You may also want to compute other revenue calculations, such as revenue by geography, revenue by product line, or average sale: revenue by customer, if you feel these may be meaningful to your business.

Customer Acquisition Cost (CAC)

How much does it cost your business to acquire a new customer?  That is the customer acquisition cost and is made up of marketing and selling costs, including marketing and selling labor.  You’ll need the number of new customers acquired during 2016 in order to calculate this number.

Compare this number to prior years as well as industry peers.  You can potentially do a lot to lower this number by boosting your marketing skills and implementing lower cost marketing channels.

Overhead Costs

Overhead costs are costs that are not directly attributable to producing or selling your products and services.  They include items such as rent, telephone, insurance, legal expenses, and executive salaries.  Although it’s not standard practice to break out overhead expenses from other expenses on an income statement, it’s valuable to know the numbers for performance purposes.

Compare your overhead costs to prior years and industry averages.  You can actively manage your overhead cost by re-negotiating with vendors on a regular basis and trimming where it makes sense.

Profit Margins

Your profit margin can help you determine which division of your business is most profitable.  If you sell more than one product or service, you can compute a gross or net margin by product or service.  You can also compute margins by geography, sales rep, employee, customer, or any other meaningful segment of your business.

Your accounting system may be able to generate an income statement by division if everything has been coded correctly and overhead has been allocated appropriately.  Reach out if you’d like us to help you with this.

Seeing which service or product is most profitable can help you decide if you want to try to refocus marketing efforts, change prices, discontinue items, fire employees, attract a different type of customer, or any number of other important decisions for your business.

Breakeven Point

Do you know how many units you need to sell in order to start generating a profit?  If not, the breakeven calculation can help you learn this information.  The formula is Fixed Costs / (Sales Price per Unit – Variable Costs per Unit) which results in the number of units you need to sell in order to “break even” or cover your overhead costs.

The breakeven point helps you plan the amount of volume you need in order to ensure that you have healthy profits and plenty of cash flow in your business.

These five numbers can help you interpret your business performance on a deeper level so you can make better decisions that will lead to increased success in your business.  If we can help with any of them, please give us a call any time.

Understanding Payment Terms

If there is a period of time between when your customers receive your goods or services and when they pay for them, then several things are true:

  • You have a balance in Accounts Receivable on your balance sheet that represents how much customers owe you
  • You have an invoice process that you follow
  • You have granted credit to customers
  • You may have some that don’t pay as quickly as you’d like them to

Each invoice you send should have payment terms listed.  A payment term is the period of time you expect the invoice to be paid by the customer.  Your payment terms should be set by you, not your customers!

Payment terms are always measured from the invoice date and define when the payment should be received.  Here are some common payment terms in accounting terminology, and then in English.

Net 30
Payment is due 30 days from the invoice date.

2/10 Net 30
Payment is due 30 days from the invoice date.  If you pay the invoice in 10 days, you can take a 2% discount off the total amount of the invoice as an early pay discount incentive.

Due Upon Receipt
Payment is due immediately

If you use Net 30 or Due Upon Receipt, then you may want to change your terms to get paid faster.  When people see Due Upon Receipt, sometimes they translate it into “I can take my time.”  A more specific term spelled out such as Net 7 or Net 10 will actually get you your money faster than Due Upon Receipt.

Do you have issues with people paying you late?  If so, you might want to set consequences.  Consider adding a line on your invoice that provides interest charges if the payment is late.  Utility companies do it, and so do many businesses.  A common percentage to charge is 1% – 2%, however, some states have laws that limit you to 10% or another percentage.

The wording would be something like this:

“Accounts not paid within __ days of the date of the invoice are subject to a __% monthly finance charge.”

You will also need to make sure your accounting system can automatically compute these fees.

If you have questions about payment terms, your invoicing process, or your accounts receivable, please reach out.

Signs You Might Be Outgrowing Your Accounting System

If you’re struggling with your accounting system, it might be a sign that you’re ready for something new.  Perhaps your company has grown so much that it’s outgrown its older accounting solution.  Here are several indications to look for that justify moving to an accounting system with more features and scalability.

User Permissions

Some companies have a need to limit certain functions to certain users.  Most systems come with basic functional limitations, such as restricting Accounts Payable and Accounts Receivable functions.  But what if you need more granular user permissions such as access to only purchase orders or a certain bank account?  Mid-market systems like QuickBooks Enterprise provide those features.

Multiple Companies and Consolidated Financial Statements

Do you have multiple companies that are the “children” of a parent company?  You might need consolidated financial statements and the ability to open multiple companies at the same time.

Number of Customers and Vendors    

If your business is growing and the number of customers and vendors you do business with exceeds 14,500, you will have reached a list limit in QuickBooks Premier.  Each system has their own list limits, and these limits can get complex quickly, so check with us if you feel you are getting close.

File Size and Performance 

There may also be file size limits that you need to watch, especially if you have a high volume of transactions or multiple years of history in one file.

You could also have performance issues.  If you have a new PC and your accounting system is still running slowly, we can help you improve your performance by condensing your file or setting preferences differently before you have to switch.

Inventory Features

A mid-market system like QuickBooks Enterprise provides advanced features, such as tracking inventory in multiple locations, using the FIFO method, and managing lots or serial numbers.  If you need these features, it may be worth it to switch.

Enhanced Customization   

Most mid-market accounting systems provide better customization such as additional custom fields, better reporting, and improved form design.

Number of Simultaneous Users

The final reason to switch to a larger accounting system is if you need more simultaneous users.  QuickBooks Pro allows for up to three simultaneous users, QuickBooks Premier handles up to five, and QuickBooks Enterprise makes room for up to 30 simultaneous users.  QuickBooks Online allows up to 25 simultaneous users.   Check with us if you are curious about your system’s license limits.

Did any of these reasons resonate with you?  If so, let us know so we can discuss your needs.

Beyond Saving Trees: New Trends in Receipt Management

Accounting automation has come a long way in the last few years, and the process of handling invoices and receipts is included in those changes. No longer is there a mountain of paperwork to deal with. In this article, we’ll explain some of the changes in this area.

Vendor Invoices

Most invoices are now sent electronically, often through email or from accounting system to accounting system. Some accounting systems allow the invoice document, usually in PDF format, to be attached to the transaction in the accounting system. This feature makes it easy for vendor support questions as well as any audit that may come up.

Some systems are smart enough to “read” the invoice and prepare a check with little or no data entry. Others are able to automate three-way matching – this is when you match a purchase order, packing slip, and invoice together – so that time is saved in the accounts payable function.

Receipts

Today’s systems allow you or your bookkeeper to scan in or take cell phone photos of receipts – whether cash or credit card – and then “read” them and record the transaction. This type of system cuts way down on data entry and allows the accountants to focus on more consultative work rather than administrative work.

Some vendors will email you receipts so all you have to do is use a special email address where your accountant is copied or forward the receipt as you receive it.

The biggest challenge for business owners is getting into the habit of photographing the receipt and sending it to the accountant. The days of shoebox receipts are not completely over, but cloud-savvy business owners are definitely enjoying the alternative options of today’s paperless world.

Approvals

Some systems automate bill approval. This is especially handy for nonprofits or companies with a multi-person approval process. It cuts down on approval time and the time it takes to pay the bill.

New Systems

Here is a short list of new systems that automate a part of the vendor payment or receipt management system. There are a lot more, in addition to your core accounting system, and all of them have different features, platforms, software requirements, integration options, and pricing.

  1. Bill.com
  2. Hubdoc
  3. Receipt Bank
  4. Expensify
  5. SmartVault
  6. Doc.it
  7. Tallie
  8. Concur
  9. LedgerSync
  10. ShoeBoxed
  11. ShareFile
  12. DropBox

If you are interested in finding out more about automating your accounts payable invoices or receipts, please reach out anytime.

5 Metrics to Gauge Your Business Performance

Sometimes, the most telling numbers in your business are not necessarily on the monthly reports. Although the foundation of your finances revolves around the balance sheet and income statement, there are a few numbers that, when known and tracked, can make a huge impact on your business decision-making. Here are five:

1. Revenue per employee.

Even if you are a solo business owner, revenue per employee can be an interesting number. It’s easy to compute: take total revenue for the year and divide by the number of employees you had during the year. You may need to average the number in case you had turnover or adjust it for part-time employees.

Whether your number is good or bad depends on the industry you’re in as well as a host of other factors. Compare it to prior years; is the number increasing (good) or decreasing (not so good)? If it’s decreasing you might want to investigate why. It could be you have many new employees who need training so that your productivity has slipped. It could also be that revenue has declined.

2. Customer acquisition cost.

If you’ve ever watched Shark Tank®, you know that CAC is one of the most important numbers for investors. This is how much it costs you in marketing and selling costs to acquire a new client. Factors such as annual revenue, or even lifetime value of a client will affect how low or high you can allow this number to go.

3. Cash burn rate.

How fast do you go through cash? The cash burn rate calculates this for you. Compute the difference between your starting and ending cash balances and divide that number by the number of months it covers. The result is a monthly value. This is especially important for startups that have not shown a profit yet so they can figure out how much cash they need to borrow or raise to fund their venture.

4. Revenue per client.

Revenue per client is a good measure to compare from year to year. Are clients spending more or less with you, on average, than last year?

5. Customer retention.

If you are curious as to how many customers return year after year, you can compute your client retention percentage. Make a list of all the customers who paid you money last year. Then create a list of customers who have paid you this year. (You’ll need to two full years to be accurate). Merge the two lists. Count how many customers you had in the first year. Then count the customers who paid you money in both years. The formula is:

Number of customer who paid you in both years / Number of customers in the first or prior year * 100 = Customer retention rate as a percentage

New customers don’t count in this formula. You’ll be able to see what percentage of customers came back in a year. You can also modify this formula for any length of time you wish to measure.

Try any of these five metrics so you’ll gain richer financial information about your business’s performance. And as always, if we can help, be sure to reach out.

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