[1] When you have paper receipts do you scan them?
Hell no. They snap a picture of them with an app like Entryless or Expensify, where they get automatically classified and synced with the accounting system.

[2] How do you have staff code and authorize expenditures and keep that info with the digital receipt?
Staff don’t need to classify transactions. That’s the job of the Finance team. What the Finance team needs is a description of the expenditure and the grant it was for, if that applies.

Staff don’t authorize expenditures, either. That’s up to the ED, who sets policy and then reviews expenditures in the accounting system or an app. Some apps (like Bill.com) and some accounting systems (like Xero) have an Authorize button for bills.

[3] How do you store all these digital bits?
In the app and/or attached to the transaction itself in the accounting system.

[4] How do you pass on the receipt, coding, and authorization to the person signing checks?
In the app & accounting system. In Xero, for example, there is an in-program authorization button for payables.

[5] If there’s fancy software that does this all, what is it and how much does it cost?
It’s not fancy software. It’s cheap and zillions of people are using it. Times have changed. Thank goodness.
Check out Entryless ($22.49/mo), Xero ($30/mo for unlimited users), Bill.com ($19.95/mo).

[6] How much server space does 7 years of “paperwork” eat up?
Servers have evolved. First of all, in most cases you’re not using your own server but that of your cloud-based app, and (a) you don’t care how much space these documents take up, and (b) they’ve got such economies of scale that the space is dirt cheap. See pricing above.

But secondly, server space is cheaper now than it has ever been. So if you run out of space, you buy more. It’s not a big deal. Certainly cheaper than renting a bigger building to store more paper files, and because no one actually does that since that idea is ridiculous, I’ll mention that it’s still cheaper than renting a storage unit for your older paper files, which plenty of people do. And it’s less risky. Paper file can be so easily damaged. Flooding, fire, mold…stuff happens.

Two final points on questions that you didn’t ask:
[7] The risks are higher when everything is on paper:
[a] The savvy cloud-based providers have redundant servers in geographic locations with different natural disaster profiles (“we here at San Andreas Cloud Services store all of your data securely in a nearby warehouse!”)
[b] Paper is easily stolen, lost, or otherwise messed with. When everything is electronic, all you have to do is revoke access when an employee leaves, for example.
[c] You’re stuck with local auditors, whether or not they’re any good, whether or not they charge competitively, plus you have to pay more for all of the shlepping they have to do for the field work. Plus the audit takes longer. Which the Board really loves. Whee! Last year for a new client we cut the timeline from “year-end” to “board presentation of the financials” from 8 months to 4 months. So having everything available paperlessly gives you more leverage to shop around, and if you live in a major metropolitan area you can get an auditor in a lower COL area and pay less but without sacrificing the level of service.

[8] And lastly – this applies only to some organizations, but in those cases, the costs are outweighed by the revenues generated in the physical space that is now freed up. What does the org get to put there, in the entire office drowning in file cabinets? Another fundraising professional, perhaps?

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